Archive for the Tribute Category

Musicians Can Give Life

Posted in Clyde Blosl, Donor, Fender guitars, Giving Thanks, Life, Life Center Northwest, Lifesaving, save a life, Talent, Tribute with tags , , , , , on April 22, 2013 by damngoodtunes

Clyde Blosl modified

You may recall the story we did a couple years back about a man named Clyde Blosl, a name you would be hard pressed to find many of in many places of this world, let alone western Washington. Clyde was an exceptional musician and good friend to this writer since an early age. This story continues now, as we learn that Clyde Blosl was an organ donor and, in a way Clyde continues to live on. This report has so inspired me that I can only think of the breadth of applications should musicians throughout the USA, Canada and the rest of the world were to become as caring and giving as was our friend Clyde. And now, as Paul Harvey used to say – is the rest of the story;

On April 15th 2013 this editor-owner was invited to meet with the Governor of Washington State on behalf of the
Blosl family to receive an award acknowledging that Clyde Blosl had donated his organs in order that others might have a better chance at life. In particular, Clyde’s liver was donated to a Mr. Paul Brown, a youth Pastor near Tacoma Washington. On this day, Mr. Brown and his wife met with the Blosl family for the very first time. Tears and hugs were exchanged as much emotion and love filled the room .

Paul Brown - Recipient

Paul Brown – Recipient

Governor Jay Inslee has stepped forward to make Washington state number 1 for designated organ donor endorsements on driver’s licenses – having seen a 22% increase in just a little over a year, ranking the state as number three in the nation to 69 per cent willing to donate and possibly save other lives. Governor Inslee went on to tell us that his own son’s eyesight was restored due to his receiving a corneal implant.

The Incredible team leaders from LifeCenter Northwest work selflessly 24-7 to facilitate all phases and dimensions from logistics to consolation of family members – both donor and recipient. Please visit their website by clicking the Life Center Northwest Logo in this feature

Local regional newspaper, The Daily Chronicle with reporter Lisa Broadt had contacted me the week prior to the event and arranged a pre-meeting between Clyde Blosl’s brother Richard, Lisa and myself. We were all together for the entire day at the Capitol building and later over at Providence St. Peter’s Hospital in Lacey for more of the ceremony and the meetings of the Brown and Blosl families. Ms. Broadt’s coverage of the story encompassed two full-paged articles in the Daily Chronicle, providing excellent advertisement for the Life Center Northwest and the importance of organ donation at large.

We sincerely appreciate the cooperation with Lisa Broadt, The Daily Chronicle – Chronline.com and mutual concerns shared with and about my dear friend Clyde Blosl

Life Center Northwest

Life Center Northwest

www.lcnw.org

Richard Blosl - Clyde's brother with Paul Brown

Richard Blosl – Clyde’s brother with Paul Brown

Washington state Governor Jay Inslee and writer Bruce Maier

Washington state Governor Jay Inslee and writer Bruce Maier

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Tribute Song and Documentary Film

Posted in Kickstarter, Mickey Jones, Tribute with tags , , , , , , on October 6, 2012 by damngoodtunes

David Shriver was a friend to me for many years. David had been the Bass player on the electric Fender Bass for Eddie Cochran( Summertime Blues )in the late nineteen-fifties. After that he was world famous as the musical director for Trini Lopez which was an opportunity that brought him together as a friend to the Beatles and many more  amazing artists. Mickey Jones, who was Trini’s drummer, went on to be the drummer for Kenny Rogers and the First Edition. After that, he became a  famous actor of television and the Big Screen – then a best-selling author ( That Would Be Me ). Mickey Jones

Left to right: Bruce Maier, David Shriver and Mickey Jones

and I became great friends because of David, and when David passed away this year we were all devastated. We orchestrated a four-day memorial music jam in his honor and for some, there was closure. For myself, there was still a  story to be told and the best way I could tell it I believe is through music. Though the two of us found ourselves in the same band ( Clayton Watson and the Trends ) in the 1980s David had spent his remaining half-dozen years as my Bass player and he never ceased to amaze me at his playing ability and creativity. So, I meditated a long while and I was sent (I believe by Spirit) a great song about our friend and brother Dave. There was still more that needed to be done so I started calling on people who knew and loved David, especially those who had worked with him for long periods of time and I asked if they would participate – help me to tell the world about a gentle soul , a masterful musician who never begged to be famous or longed for his star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame. He just wanted to play music; any kind of music from symphonic classical to Blues, Jazz, Country and Rock and Roll. He was good at all of it. Very good.

David was what is called in show business, a ” side-man “. These side-men and women are the cement, the foundations of a successful act, for without the proper support of the foundation, the rest of the structure is weak – in my opinion. Yet side-persons never get the recognition they deserve and I would like to – through this documentary film and song – start the changing of the trend. I fully intend to tell the story of a great man, incredible Bassist and an artist  whose heart was known by many, and with my incredible team including Mickey Jones and Northwest legend Clayton Watson, we will also show the larger picture of the importance of being part of a humble yet strong foundation in music and the arts. Please join us in this  adventure where we will celebrate and share the life and the passion of a man who  never had anything bad to say about anyone. The link to all the information is right here. Please send this out to everyone you know! Thank you. Bruce Maier / publisher /damngoodtunes

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1751394850/rock-it-the-david-shriver-tribute

Good-Bye Etta James 1938-2012

Posted in Female Vocalist, Gold Record, Hall Of Fame, Platinum Hits, Talent, Tribute with tags , on January 29, 2012 by damngoodtunes

Etta James sang some of the finest blues we will ever know. This legendary music icon who gave us a lifetime of extraordinary music passed away last week at the age of 73 after a battle with leukemia. Her legacy includes a long list of chart topping pop, rock, soul, and jazz in addition to the blues. She did it all. Her signature was that unmistakable style and sound that could pull the life right out of every note she sang. And she sang to us for literally decades with a singing career that spanned more than 55 years. Her music wowed my parents generation in the 1960s  just as it does today for my own children who always have her music on their I-Pod play lists. Her sound simply transcends time.

A long list of awards recognizes the achievements for her many years of hard work. The Blues Foundation of Memphis, TN, supporting blues music and its heritage, have nominated James for a Blues Music Award nearly every year since their beginning in 1980. And she has received some form of their Blues Female Artist of the Year award 14 times since 1989 and she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001. Her sound was recognizable even as she crossed music’s genre of styles for which she also holds 6 Grammys and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1993 as well as the Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2001. The list of awards goes on and on.

Her recorded music will help sooth our soul as her sound lives on. But Etta James, we will miss you terribly.

Kris Edem

End of October

Posted in airfare, airlines, Independent Music, Indie Music, Internet Radio, Interviews, Jamaica, News, recording, Rock Band, songwriter, Tribute with tags , , on October 31, 2010 by damngoodtunes

The Autumn season has brought us lots of great news and recaps of the past Summer’s events. Not all the news is fun to report as was the case this last month when the world lost two more artists who were either on the cutting edge or the head of their genre as we reported to you in the recent damngoodtunes.com. Eyedea, or Michael Larsen as known to those who knew him the most, a young American lost his life at a tragic early age while Gregory Isaacs of Jamaica who although had a good life with many records and world wide fans, was also way too young to die. But then, that’s not up for us to decide now is it? We never try to go into the preachy side of life or sway one way or another politically however we feel it is important to acknowledge the passing of artists and writers who have helped to shape our world with music and beats.
And so onward we must go and positive we shall be to bring you the news of all things music and particularly Indie.
Why you may ask should this matter? Why do we do this? What if not for money would we possibly call consideration in our mission. Simply the answer is that I had a vision saying there was a way to level the slanted playing field for songwriters and performing artists all over the world, and that was to provide free press and exposure for as many as we might. We began our journey in 2007 working in a small office slightly appointed , yet free from the hustle and bustle of Urban chaos. In that room we reached out to the world VIA this medium, our friend, the internet. And you responded. Bands, producers and engineers from all countries and all walks of life took notice of the fledgling DGT and found that we were real, accessible and ethical. We won your trust. Now we are read from all corners of the globe and you the fans and readers, the artists and bands and countless others who support the industry – you have given us the strength to carry on and take this publication to the next levels. And that we will do.
Watch this coming week of November when we bring you brand new articles and features. Peace to all!
Bruce J Maier
Publisher
damngoodtunes.com
Damngood Tunes

Create Your Badge

I was always a Fender man

Posted in Giving Thanks, Guitar Player, Guitars, Independent Music, Memorial, Mentoring, Tribute with tags , , , on May 19, 2010 by damngoodtunes
Gary Edmonds - King of Cool

King Of Cool

When I was a child many of my days were spent at the Academy, learning how to dance, unlike the other boys my age who were all playing baseball and football. Music was then and is still my life but at about the age of fourteen my parents took me to a county Fair where I saw a live Rock band for the first time in my life. There they were – four of the tightest musicians I would ever come to know. They were called The Trends, led by a man named Clayton Watson. With Clayton playing drums and lead vocals, Denny on Bass, Carol on the Tenor Sax and Gary Edmonds on Guitar, these guys were an incredible group that could play everything and anything with soul and fire. My attention immediately was directed to the Guitarist in the band. He wore Spanish boots, a blazer and turtleneck shirt, was tanned and had great hair. Clutching a Fender electric guitar and playing big fat jazz chords, then ripping solos through a Fender amp and Fender Vibratone Leslie Speaker, with one leg slightly bent at the knee keeping time, this guy was the epitome of cool! I turned to my folks and said, “ that’s who I want to be! “

And so it was. That summer my dad taught my brother and I to play some chords on an old acoustic guitar he bought for us at a pawn shop and we soon discovered our new home away from home – Lohr Brothers Music Store where we, along with all the other kids into music would hang out. And there he was, Gary Edmonds the guitar teacher from planet Cool! That same dynamic lead man in The Trends was there every day and accessible to all who would gather around him. And even if you couldn’t afford or didn’t have the attention span required for one-on-one lessons with Gary, he would show you the latest guitar lick or his “ big fat Jazz chords “ just for the asking. Gary loved to teach and was good at it. Over the years he probably taught hundreds of students and some of those went on to be really great professional musicians. And he would occasionally play solo, just a minimum of gear, but always with his trusty Fender in his hands, Gary could sing the standards and current Pop and Country hits all night long.

I had many interactions over the years with Gary Edmonds and I can honestly say that every single memory I have of the man is a good one. He was witty and sharp, full of great musician jokes and of course, always willing to help out a musician in need.

Gary was a soldier in two wars – WW2 and the Korean War, ending his military career as a US Marine and very proud of what he’d done for his country. At one point he became aquatinted with my father who was also a veteran. They spent some good times talking about having been in the service and being proud of their country. Gary was like family in our house.

Mr. Edmonds was married for many years to a fine lady, Penny, who was always very supportive of his music. They had several daughters who all learned the music of their soul from their way-cool dad! I don’t know a lot of other personal things about Gary but I can tell you that in my whole musical career the one time that I actually got to work on a professional job with him was a highlight of my life. He played Bass Guitar on that occasion because arthritis was preventing him from making a tight grip around a Telecaster neck. Halfway through the gig though we were asked to play some Big Band era standards that were way over my technical head and Gary said “ OK Man , I’ll give it a try ! “ And the guy absolutely tore it up and set the place on fire! I will never forget that moment.

Gary Edmonds, sometimes professionally referred to as “ Dad “ was our iconic hero in our little town where my friends and I grew up. He was always the coolest guy with those slick waves in his hair, the pack of smokes rolled up in his short-sleeved shirt which incidentally left the tattoos on his arms exposed. But the musician that he was transcended the normal levels of technical prowess that most of us could ever hope for in this life. He was simply the best.

The other day, as many of the musicians who loved and admired him were shuffling in, one by one to be at his bedside with family, Gary and I got talking about guitars. He said “ I had a nice Gretch once and it played real well, but I just couldn’t get used to it. I was always a Fender man.” When it was time for us to go and respectfully leave space for his loving family, I stood up and told him something I always wanted to say , that although many of us may have learned to copy his tricks and chops over the years, none of us would ever be cool. Not like him. As I turned for the door I said “ see ya later Daddy-O! “ Gary raised his arm and gave us a silent “thumbs up “. Three nights later with his wife and family at his side, Gary Edmonds began his journey in the afterlife.

One Cool Cat and 1 Nerd

Jerry McGinnis

Posted in Guitar Player, Indie Music, Memorial, recording, Reviews, Tribute with tags , , on April 12, 2010 by damngoodtunes

This evening I have returned home after a five-hour memorial jam session for some one who most of you have never heard of but someone you knew at one time, Jerry McGinnis. Don’t worry… this is not going to be some long drawn out sad  story to bum you out or make you cry. Hang in there for a minute.

Jerry was a fine guitarist and singer with a love for music which was  second only to his love and dedication to family. He grew up and lived, and died in a small town somewhere in the USA . The name of the place would mean nothing to most of you but you can make up your own name because you’ve been there. Jerry was a baby-boomer who had gravitated to music and the guitar at an early age.  He excelled at vocals and guitar- the Fender Stratocaster to be precise. A handsome young man and one of those guys who could wear long hair,  a full beard and he always  looked sharp! Jerry played in a lot of bands but most of the time in the early years he worked with his brother Ron, who also happened to wield a Fender Strat. They were one of the first groups to ever come out of our area that had that Allman Brothers thing going on with the dual lead guitars playing in precise perfect pitch harmonies and they not only blew the audiences away but also all the other bands and musicians who would drive long distances just to hear Jerry and Ron play those hot guitars and sing. At some point down the road, the brothers went different directions and both would earn the respect and many accolades of their peers and fans alike. I was fortunate to have worked in bands with each of the McGinnis Brothers at different times in my own professional career, first with Jerry over twenty-eight years ago and then with Ron a few years later. There was never a dull moment with either of the guys and the musicianship was always on a higher level than some of the other bands I’d played in, but back when I worked with Jerry McGinnis he was the guy who was always motivating the band to push the envelope, go outside of our comfort zones and learn some of the newest material being played on the radio.  He always brought something new and fresh to rehearsals and the stage and was a strong front man and leader.

Jerry playing with Backfire

There was something more about Jerry that everyone loved and that was his smile. He had such a great smile and  it was never hard to make him laugh and he loved to amuse others as well. When he was in ” the zone ” and playing that guitar I’d look over and see this little grin coming from him.  He truly loved to play and sing in a band. To him, there was nothing else quite like it in life.  About a year ago after a series of heart attacks which had come and gone over a period of years, Jerry had a serious one while performing on stage with the band he had been working in for a long time, Backfire. The EMT’s worked on him on the stage that night. Later his doctor would ground him from ever playing music on stage professionally again. His dream, passion and livelihood had come to an end and I can only imagine what it was like for him to be forced to give it up.

About ten days ago Jerry McGinnis fought and lost his last fight with a weakened heart and we lost a brother and a great friend. Today through the concerted efforts of the community, The Backfire Band, family and friends and the Fraternal Order of the Eagles,  Jerry was honored in an all-day jam session. Musicians from all over came to play tribute to their fallen Brother. I was so lucky to have had the chance to get up and play in remembrance of one of my friends who happens to be  one of my own personal guitar heroes.

In life as we meander down along that long lost highway of time and experiences  we have all enjoyed music – though  not all of us receive the calling to be a  professional musician and an entertainer, nor do most of us become great ball players or authors.  We’ve all known someone like Jerry who could play the guitar or throw a ball better than most  anyone else in our home town.  And, we’ve admired and sometimes even idolized these people although the major leagues and the major labels never heard of them. The fame thing really doesn’t matter does it ? It didn’t matter to Jerry and do you know why? Because when you’re a musician and it’s embedded into the core of your being, your essence and your soul – you play for the pure love and the joy of playing. And that my friends is true greatness.

Jerry McGinnis leaves behind a large close family, many friends and a community which will never forget him. The Eagles hall was filled with hundreds who would rather raise a glass of cheer to his memory than to sob in their emptiness alone. For a few moments we sat in silence as the band played along with a beautiful rendition of Jerry singing Bob Dylan’s immortal ” Knocking On Heaven’s Door “. His voice  clean, clear and sweet. His ever tasty guitar soothing like a beckoning to the Angels.  Jerry McGinnis didn’t have to knock for long – there were smiling faces eagerly awaiting his arrival on the other side.

bjm